Indiana Jonz Stone Quarry Page

Hastyface.com travel and expedition is a Wisconsin DBA.

Lowertier.JPG Midtier.JPG Toptier.JPG
Meteoritic.JPG lilEgypt.JPG
My home is also the site of a company called Spancrete. Concrete with cables embedded and hollowed out for less weight.
Many folks build a two story garage with it, or else buy scrap pieces for hard surfscape.
Lately the management has stopped selling scrap pieces. Perhaps for a large order they might.
However, it's another expample of here today, gone tomorrow, available local materials.

This is technology said to have been brought back from Germany after WWII, and again I do not represent the product, only
the fact that the location is convenient and co-incident with my internet services and agent business style.

Egyptian Sand Stone Was TOO SOFT to lay flat. It HAD to be laid nearly vertical in spite of low rainfall amounts.

    The pictures I present are not intended to represent a product. These show approximate prices and finish, sizes and textures only. There are 5 local quarries to chose amount those with, however even the name of those quarries are registered trademards. Because my primary motiviation is travel, and presenting expamples of loaclly travel friendly resources where one easily could justify travel in my direction I am still consistant with my no liability small project business model here. What I need to explain is that for retaining walls, especially in northern winter freezing climates, the mass of each stone must be substantial to retain soil.

    The amount of weight or mass required depends on how slippery the underside bearing surface is, if adhesive glue is used, and what layer we are talking about as well as any webbing attached with glue that extends back into the soil to help tie in the stone.

    In my BRIEF photo description here, I can, just to prepare one for the costs involved versus buying at local discount building houses, give some ballpark prices. They are quoted to me by the sales person here in the town where I live and have dealt with in the past, using my side crane trailer. The Lower tier stone shown is $750 and measures 8 foot by one foot thick and 2 feet deep. The mid tier stone is $26 per square foot and the top tier runs between $180 and $220 and is 'sorted' by thickness as it should not be saw cut stone. Using saw cut stone is both much more expensive and makes it slippery and less good at retaining soil. I will also show picures of 16 foot wide specially machined steps I have bought and laid using the same anchoring techniques. The point here is that the method of anchoring stone is tried and true, and not a new experiment for me. Home buyers and architects often focus more on buying material and less on these important facts, although contractors do undertand that there are additional costs and labor. I feel it is unlikelly a contractor or architect or even a new home builder will be using my travel centric and internet do-good business model, so that is not a problem for me. In the end, the internet either makes life and selection broader and permitting, or it buries the truth. Strangly, the ancient Mayan word for permit and to bury are the same word, just pronounced slightly differently.

    The pictures I present are not intended to represent a product. These show approximate prices and finish, sizes and textures only. There are 5 local quarries to chose amount those with, however even the name of those quarries are registered trademards. Because my primary motiviation is travel, and presenting expamples of loaclly travel friendly resources where one easily could justify travel in my direction I am still consistant with my no liability small project business model here. What I need to explain is that for retaining walls, especially in northern winter freezing climates, the mass of each stone must be substantial to retain soil.

    The amount of weight or mass required depends on how slippery the underside bearing surface is, if adhesive glue is used, and what layer we are talking about as well as any webbing attached with glue that extends back into the soil to help tie in the stone.

    In my BRIEF photo description here, I can, just to prepare one for the costs involved versus buying at local discount building houses, give some ballpark prices. They are quoted to me by the sales person here in the town where I live and have dealt with in the past, using my side crane trailer. The Lower tier stone shown is $750 and measures 8 foot by one foot thick and 2 feet deep. The mid tier stone is $26 per square foot and the top tier runs between $180 and $220 and is 'sorted' by thickness as it should not be saw cut stone. Using saw cut stone is both much more expensive and makes it slippery and less good at retaining soil. I will also show picures of 16 foot wide specially machined steps I have bought and laid using the same anchoring techniques. The point here is that the method of anchoring stone is tried and true, and not a new experiment for me. Home buyers and architects often focus more on buying material and less on these important facts, although contractors do undertand that there are additional costs and labor. I feel it is unlikelly a contractor or architect or even a new home builder will be using my travel centric and internet do-good business model, so that is not a problem for me. In the end, the internet either makes life and selection broader and permitting, or it buries the truth. Strangly, the ancient Mayan word for permit and to bury are the same word, just pronounced slightly differently.