Indiana Jonz Bronze & Iron Page

Hastyface.com travel and expedition is a Wisconsin DBA.

Egyptian Tsem and Mayan Tsul have exactly the same meaning. They refer to 'Junior'. Guessed it yet? A DOG.

    I am lucky to have direct access to a variety of local foundries that will cast bronze or iron. For iron casting, a wood shape of some kind is needed, but their rule is that whatever I give them, will and almost always is, be destroyed in the process of reproducing the item. So, on wood piece, one casting. In simple shaped the cast item can sometimes be used to make a sand molding impression to make another less detailed item. I have had good luck making ornamental urns of bronze with very detailed surfaces, good color and dynamic curves and shapes. Bronze gets expensive at an average $5 per pound, so when I come by some scrap bronze, I collect it if possible. A paint pail full of bronze weighs about 100 pounds. A foundry must be small to do this kind of work because there are just too many beaurocratic and phoney quality control and sales people with commissions to jump through otherwise. There I said it. But that really needed to be said.

    I can design and have machined wood pieces if there are enough pieces in a single order to make it pay. Most yard and garden work however is best done on tight budgets with 4 or 6 pieces being enough, especially with iron that takes two years of rust conversion re-coating before it is ready for a light fiberglass resin finish coat. Joinery of elements is also something I have much experience with. However the best joinery is by using a 3 phase miller welder. While other types work, there is a bid difference in the strength, penetration, amount of material laid quickly. There are many rural farm locations that have 3 phase power here, but mainly it usually requires a mobile weld unit. These units require especially heavy copper cable if they use only electricity to weld. TIG welding is preferred. It does require more experience with safety and control of all the elements when using electric arc only welding.

    I do a lot of that kind of metal work, and I do it on low budgets. Often, in Wisconsin, the wonderful quarries combine with the ironwork to make possible a complete project that will certainly be re-couped upon sale as well as adding a constant element of appreciation every day they are used. Just as nice to work with are old Harvestor Silos. I have taken these down and built my own porch as well as the roof of a building using them. The gems are the 40 foot short silos.

    I am lucky to have direct access to a variety of local foundries that will cast bronze or iron. For iron casting, a wood shape of some kind is needed, but their rule is that whatever I give them, will and almost always is, be destroyed in the process of reproducing the item. So, on wood piece, one casting. In simple shaped the cast item can sometimes be used to make a sand molding impression to make another less detailed item. I have had good luck making ornamental urns of bronze with very detailed surfaces, good color and dynamic curves and shapes. Bronze gets expensive at an average $5 per pound, so when I come by some scrap bronze, I collect it if possible. A paint pail full of bronze weighs about 100 pounds. A foundry must be small to do this kind of work because there are just too many beaurocratic and phoney quality control and sales people with commissions to jump through otherwise. There I said it. But that really needed to be said.

    I can design and have machined wood pieces if there are enough pieces in a single order to make it pay. Most yard and garden work however is best done on tight budgets with 4 or 6 pieces being enough, especially with iron that takes two years of rust conversion re-coating before it is ready for a light fiberglass resin finish coat. Joinery of elements is also something I have much experience with. However the best joinery is by using a 3 phase miller welder. While other types work, there is a bid difference in the strength, penetration, amount of material laid quickly. There are many rural farm locations that have 3 phase power here, but mainly it usually requires a mobile weld unit. These units require especially heavy copper cable if they use only electricity to weld. TIG welding is preferred. It does require more experience with safety and control of all the elements when using electric arc only welding.

    I do a lot of that kind of metal work, and I do it on low budgets. Often, in Wisconsin, the wonderful guarries combine with the ironwork to make possible a complete project that will certainly be re-couped upon sale as well as adding a constant element of appreciation every day they are used. Just as nice to work with are old Harvestor Silos. I have taken these down and built my own porch as well as the roof of a building using them. The gems are the 40 foot short silos.